Latest News

The Gender Pay Gap has been making headlines for decades – so how much progress has been made?

By Liz Bernier

Seventy-four cents on the dollar. That’s a figure cited almost endlessly in conversation about the Gender Pay Gap. For every dollar earned by a male worker, a female worker earns an average of 74 cents.

Downplaying identity to blend into a workplace hurts both the individual and the organization. Author and NYU law professor Kenji YoshinO discusses the phenomenon and offers advice on how HR CAN handle it.

By Melissa Campeau

Kenji Yoshino is Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law and the director of the Centre for Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging with NYU School of Law in New York. He’s also the author of Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights (published in 2006).

A compilation of the best recommendations from this year’s expert interviews

While the focus traditionally is put on how to give feedback, how you receive it is equally as important

By Craig Dowden, Ph.D.

Douglas Stone is the best-selling author of the widely recognized and respected book, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most. He is also a lecturer at Harvard Law School and consults around the world to leading organizations including Fidelity, Honda, HP, Merck, Shell and Time Warner, on topics such as negotiation and mediation.

What employers need to know

By Chris Bonnett and Allan Smofsky

Being told that you or someone close to you has cancer is devastating. But two facts may surprise you: first, there were over 810,000 Canadians in 2009 with a cancer diagnosis over the ten previous years who were still alive. Second, this matter to employers because 43 per cent of all cancer diagnoses occur in working-age Canadians, including 70 per cent of all breast cancer diagnoses. If your company has not yet faced this issue, it is unlikely to be so lucky forever. There is now nearly a 50 per cent lifetime probability of any one of us getting cancer.

Recruiting, retaining, training and assessing your organization’s sales force in the new world of work

By Tom Schoenfelder, Ph.D.

The rapidly evolving world of sales is causing significant changes in how companies hire and train their sales force. Because today’s buyers are much more aware of features and benefits, alternative offerings and reviews from other customers, salespeople must now add value by conveying much deeper knowledge of the needs of the client organization, competitor activity, trends in the customer’s own client base and how the product or