Legal Words

An extreme tool when trust has been broken

By Mark Repath

Companies place a considerable amount of trust in their employees. Confidential and sensitive information that has taken years and millions of dollars to develop is placed at the disposal of various employees within an organization. In the vast majority of cases, this confidential information and trust is not abused by employees.

It’s more than a minimum wage increase

By Lyndee Patterson

Ontario’s workplaces are changing. The demands of the modern consumer, the impact of new technology, the increasing individualization of career paths and the rise of the gig economy have collectively had a significant impact on how we all earn our living.

Computer forensics and legal implications

By Aniko Kiss and Matthew Law

Companies frequently have to deal with departing employees who try to take confidential information to a competitor and/or use the company’s confidential information to poach its clients and customers.

Employees must meet the required criteria to qualify for entitlement

By Malcolm MacKillop, Hendrik Nieuwland and Amelia Cooke, with assistance from Seth Holland

As of Jan. 1, 2018, Ontario workers will be entitled to claim benefits from the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) for chronic mental stress injuries arising out of and in the course of their employment.

The same conduct may ground an award of damages for sexual harassment and moral damages

By Nadia Zaman

In a blog post about the Harvey Weinstein scandal and sexual harassment, Toronto lawyer Stuart Rudner of Rudner Law asserted that after the scandal took place, sexual harassment could no longer be seen as a “cost of doing business.” That may leave you wondering: what is the cost?

Unfair investigations can get employers in hot water

By Rich Appiah

An Alberta employee was recently awarded $75,000 for the reputational harm and mental distress he suffered from an unfair workplace investigation into his alleged misconduct and his employer’s unfounded allegations of cause for his dismissal. The decision in Lalonde v. Sena Solid Waste is another caution that employers will suffer significant financial penalty if they dismiss their employees in bad faith.